What Is Entura Art?

Entura art, a unique drawing technique was so named and is being taught by Patricia Hayes, founder of Delphi University and Spirit Center in McCaysville, Georgia. Ms. Hayes was the personal assistant to Arthur Ford. She is a gifted spiritual channel and has spent the past 40 years teaching people to develop their spiritual abilities.

Entura art involves entering a meditative state and communicating with Spirit. Similar to channeled writing, Entura art is automatic and uses color. There is little “thinking” involved. Art itself uses the left brain for technique and Entura art requires none of this knowledge. In fact, the beauty of this is that no prior art experience is necessary.

Relaxation is key. You ask a question and the information is received. It is as if you serve as a container collecting the information until you sit down to “draw it” from you and put it to paper. The relaxed state continues as one draws what comes through Energy.

The colors have meaning; the shapes have meaning. Without intending, people draw faces, animals, and forms. Each element has a reason for being there.

In the Entura art course, some exercises included meditation and writing. From there, you create the art. After the artwork is completed, the relaxed state continues because that is from where the image is interpreted. Remember, the artwork answers a question. The images are very beautiful and wonderful to view. No matter how many times you see it, you may find something in the art work you had never seen before. This numinous information is multi-layered, representative of our spiritual selves.

My experience has been what I call “Brainstorming in the Etheric Realm.” Floods of sensations, feelings, ideas, moved through me. It was a completely different state of consciousness, beyond how I used to draw. I captured all of the information that flowed through my third eye. Everything related, the magnitude of it all. It was literally cosmic and yet familiar.

I have had drawing instruction from various artists since I was a child and attended a vocational high school where the arts were major courses. I found that when doing Entura art I draw faces better than I have ever done before.

This state of being is always available to each of us. It is expressive and deepens your relationship with Spirit. For those who may have had difficulty learning meditation, Entura art may be the creative breakthrough that can serve you.

For a look at Ms. Hayes’ work and others who have studied Entura art, visit the Entura Art Graduates and Artists group at Facebook.com. Click on the photos tab and see what has been contributed to the gallery. You will see many, many different styles but they all bring us back to Spirit. Click on Ms. Hayes’ name to visit her personal gallery.

Even though I discussed my uncle’s birthday with relatives, it still slipped my mind to send a birthday card. Eventually, I remembered and went to stores to get one. They were neither attractive nor suitable. Thoughts pop into my mind a lot; this time it was I can create the card. Spirit “appeared” in Mind and it occurred to me I could ask for their assistance in its creation. I asked Spirit if they had a message for my uncle who was about to enter the one hundredth year of being alive on the planet in this lifetime. The message was beautiful, a reminder of God in Action daily through his wife who also a reverend. My aunt is taking care of him as he experiences Alzheimer’s. The channeling was moving. The image has faces of energy with rejoicing expressions of love.

Hand Piercings, Finger Piercings, and Hand Web Piercings

Hand Piercings, Finger Piercings, and Hand Web piercings are all very rare and rather extreme. In fact, if you are even considering getting one of these piercings, you are truly one of the brave. The pain varies, and in fact usually there is minimal pain involved with the piercing, but the aftercare of these particular piercings is only for the stringent at heart.

Your hands are two of the most active places on your body. They are constantly in motion, they are full of germs, and they are very sensitive (all those nerves running through our hands help the brain process pain, pleasure, and temperatures). A contemporary phenomenon is getting the surfaces on your hands pierced. I’m not against these piercings at all, but more than most piercings, it is important you understand the risks before committing to the piercing.

Hand piercings are all surface piercings, so they are susceptible to the usual suspects – migration and rejection. Your hands are chock full of muscles, tendons, and nerves, so the constant motion of your hands don’t exactly work in your favor. Generally, the less disturbed the piercing area, the quicker and more successful the healing. With hand piercings you will not have the luxury keeping a hand “protected”. It will be exposed to the elements, germs, daily stresses, and abuses straightaway. For this reason, only get a hand piercing if you are willing to do the following.

First of all, you must clean it religiously. Your piercer will recommend cleaning it somewhere around three times a day with a warm saline solution – don’t skip this step! The saline helps keep the piercing site clean and free of buildup. You will have special instructions concerning which soap you can use, what moisturizer you can use, what liquids or gels you can’t put on your hands (Neosporin is always a no-no), ad infinitum. Smoking is definitely discouraged with a hand piercing, for the cigarette smoke that will inevitably drift around it will irritate your new piercing and prolong the healing. You must also be sure to keep the piercing site clean, not just from germs, but from dirt, trash, food, etc. Remember, you have a very delicate piercing that is being assaulted from all sides, so be careful!

Your lifestyle may have to change as well during the healing period. Besides not smoking, you shouldn’t be wearing gloves (they can tear the piercings out) or engaging in any activity that may put your hands at risk. If your career heavily depends on using your hands, you may want to think about getting one of these piercings extra carefully. Your everyday life will be affected by this piercing for at least a year – which is the general healing time. If you’ve never had a body piercing before, this probably isn’t a good one to start out with!

Now that the risks are known, and you still want to go ahead, here is what you can expect! For starters, don’t get pierced with a ring or hoop. You are just begging for it to get ripped out! Your hands touch too many objects everyday and a ring jutting out will get snared on something and it will be gone before you know it. Your piercer and you will decide if surface bars or curved barbells are best for your piercing location (which is largely determined by the shape of your hands, exact location, and lifestyle). It is not uncommon to have to get refitted a couple months after the piercing, for the swelling should have gone down enough to where you might need new jewelry to lie closer to the skin.

For hand piercings, the location can be almost anywhere. Surface bars will almost always be used, and the pain might be a bit intense. Rejection risk is high since there is not a lot of skin or tissue to penetrate, but with care this can be a relatively long term piercing.

Finger piercings generally don’t hurt nearly as much as they look, but these too have a high risk of migration. Generally pierced at the base of the finger to look like a ring, surface bars or barbells are used. The finger will swell after piercing, and is highly prone to infection, but by following the right aftercare and being super careful, you just may be able to make this piercing last a good long while.

Hand web piercings might be the most popular of the hand piercings – the webbing between each finger (especially between thumb and forefinger) is very thin and not hard to push a barbell through. It is also prone to rejection and migration, and infection is a very real possibility. This piercing should not affect your mobility (none of these piercings should affect any of your body functions), but the hand webs are major points in acupuncture therapy, so if you talk to an acupuncturist they probably won’t be keen on you receiving a piercing this area. There’s no western scientific evidence that piercing your hand webs will hurt you, but if you follow eastern medicine and science, you may want to hold off on web piercings.

All in all, piercings on the hand are rather extreme. They require constant care, zealous protection, regular cleaning, and even then it’s not a guarantee that these piercings will last. Yet, if you want to push the boundaries and your lifestyle affords it, you can try to get a piercing on your hand. For many people who successfully have them, it’s their favorite piercing!

Common And Uncommon Body Piercings

Though there are many piercings that can be done, you see only a few of them in the majority of clientele. Although any part of the body can be pierced, they are separated into categories. There are soft tissue, cartilage, and surface piercings. Soft tissue are by far the most common. Soft tissue piercings will penetrate the thickness of the body segment, with the jewelry protruding from opposite sides (earlobes, eyebrows, nipples). Soft tissue piercings tend to heal easily for most, with proper care. They are usually done with a ring (captive), but after the piercings heal properly, can adorn an assortment of jewelry. The minimum gauge for soft tissue piercings are 20 Gauge, but are pierced mostly with 14 Gauge.

Cartilage piercings such as septum (inner nose), and ear cartilage are generally more difficult to heal, and are prone to infection if not cared for properly.

Surface piercings are usually the least common piercing. They tend to be more painful, and are not permanent. The life span of a surface piercing will depend on the area pierced. A corset (back piercing) can usually stay inside the skin up to 48 hours before the skin will start to tear.

The most common piercings are as follows:

Ear piercings:

- Lobe

- Tragus (the rounded part nearest to the face)

-Outer edge (rim)

-Conch (inner surfaces)

-Industrial (barbell crossing inner part of ear, pierced through two portions of cartilage)

Nose:

- Nostril

- Septum (center cartilage)

Facial:

- Eyebrow

- Lip

- Labret (between lip and chin)

Body:

- Nipples

- Navel

The more uncommon piercings include:

Face:

- Bridge of nose

- Madonna (upper lip, with lebret stud)

- Madison (base of throat)

- Vampires kiss (side of neck)

- Back of neck

Extremities:

- Web between the thumb and fingers

- Surfer (web between toes)

Genitals:

- Clitoris (horizontal or vertical)

- Hood (the hood of the clitoris, horizontal or vertical)

- Inner and outer labia

- T’aint (between vagina, or penis and anus)

- Fourchette (back edge of vaginal opening)

- Triangle (beneath clitoris)

- Prince albert (base of head, through urethra)

- Queen victoria (center top of head, through urethra)

- Apadravya (vertically through head)

- Ampallang (horizontally through head)

- Frenum/ Lorum (horizontal base of the head, or along shaft)

- Hafada (scrotum)

- Forskin

- Dydoe (through ridge of circumsized head)

Conch Piercings

Conch Piercings are located within the hollow space of your ear; it is called a conch piercing because of the resemblance it has to the conch shell. Literally pierced right through the center of your ear, this is not a very popular piercing (as far as numbers go), but people who have conch piercings (and other bod mod enthusiasts) absolutely love them!

Conch Piercings go through the thick cartilage located directly in the middle of your ear. Because there is a copious amount of surrounding tissue, migration or rejection risks are nonexistent. If you are looking to begin your first foray into body piercing (outside of traditional ear lobes), this is a great piercing to start with!

Experienced and reputable piercers will not have difficulty in piercing your conch. Unlike some other ear or body piercings, there aren’t any strange angles, bends, or specific equipment that must be used. The piercing is a straight shot using a simple, basic, sterile piercing needle. The Conch is one of the easiest places to get pierced.

Once you and your piercer agree that a Conch is right for you, your piercer will recommend the best jewelry – it usually is a captive bead ring for the initial piercing. And just to forewarn you, the gauge (that is, the thickness) of the jewelry might appear to be rather large. Don’t be alarmed! These piercings call for jewelry of a larger girth, and it won’t hurt anymore than if it was pierced with a smaller gauge. Once your piercing has healed (it will take about a year to be fully and completely healed) you can replace it with a myriad of affordable and fun jewelry. The first three to six months are very crucial in the healing process, so take good care of your ear!

Your piercer will mark your ear with a marker to denote where they think it will look best on you; once you have confirmed or rearranged the position, your piercing will happen. Clamps are usually used (all they do is secure the area from moving), and a straight piercing needle will push through on your exhale. It is a very fast procedure, and your jewelry will slide in your new hole. Once your piercer has finished securing the piercing, your ear might feel a little hot and your heart may be thumping rapidly, but that is just the adrenaline and endorphin kicking in. Enjoy it while it lasts – many people live for that thrilling feeling! The actual pain ranges from person to person, but most don’t feel any pain. Like so many piercings, this one looks more painful than it actually is, so don’t be nervous!

You can get more than one piercing in your Conch, and then it’s called a Conch Orbital. Basically, an Orbital is two separate piercings joined together by one piece of jewelry (please see my orbital article for more information). You can also get the Conches in both ears pierced but I would suggest staggering these two piercings so as to ease the healing process. For example, for about 3 months after your piercings, you really shouldn’t sleep on the ear with a pierced Conch; getting both Conches pierced simultaneously may therefore interfere with your sleeping patterns and may lead to prolong healing in both ears. Discuss with your piercer if a conch orbital is right for you – if you think you may want one in the future, alert your piercer so that they can give you a piercing in the right location.

The aftercare for the Conch is very easy – not only is this an easy piercing to get, it’s easy to take care of, and it’s easy to find jewelry for it! Soaking your ear in warm salt water (properly called a saline solution) is one of the best ways to assist your new piercing. The next best thing to do is NOT TOUCH your new piercing! It’s very hard to do – it’s a new addition to your body so you will doubtless want to play with it – but don’t touch it! Human hands are covered in germs and bacteria and fidgeting with your new vulnerable piercing can lead to infection. Only touch it when you are cleaning it, and be sure your hands are clean first! Other simple tips to avoid an infection include not putting your cell phone on that ear, don’t sleep on it, don’t use headphones that go into your ear canal, and try to keep long hair away from it (it can wrap around the back) during the healing time (once it’s healed, no big deal if your hair touches it).

Taking care of your Conch is very easy, all it takes is routine cleaning, abstaining from touching it, and common sense! Your piercer will give you a complete rundown, so pay attention. Should any problems arise, return to your piercer and they should be able to provide you with more advice or solutions. Enjoy your conch, and get ready to be the envy of many!